Announcement: chemlambda can be done with RNA

There exists an encoding of chemlambda molecules with RNA, in such a way that the chemlambda model can be realized via real RNA computing. 
I shall update this post with details concerning my motivations and about how the second part of the announcement fits with my activities.
I open a bidding session concerning a contract based collaboration which could convince me that you’re an expert and you can provide me with the means to do this together. As concerns the collaboration, I shall give you an edge into being the first who does it. Letters of interest may be addressed to, or via the chemlambda repository (gh-pages branch) .
Follow this post for updates.

More about chemical transactions

There is much more about these chemical transactions and their proofs. First is that transactions are partially independent on the molecules. The blockchain may be useful only for having a distributed database of transactions and proofs, available for further use. But there’s more.

Think about this database as one of valid computations, which can then be reused in any combination or degree of parallelism. Then, that’s the field of several competitions.

The same transaction can have several proofs, shorter or longer. It can have big left pattern therefore costly to use it in another computation. Maybe a transaction goes too long and therefore it is not useful to use in combination with others.

When there is a molecule to reduce, the application of a transaction means:
– identify a subgraph isomorphic with the left pattern and pick one such subgraph
– apply the transaction to this particular subgraph (which is equivalent with: reduce only that subgraph of the molecule, and freeze the rest of the molecule, but do it in one step because the sequence of reductions is already pre-computed)

Now, which is more convenient, to reduce the molecule by using the random algorithm and the available graph rewrites, or to use some transactions which fit, which is fast (as concerns step 2) but costly (as concerns step 1), moreover it may be that there is a transaction with shorter proof for that particular molecule, which mixes parts of several available precomputed transactions.

Therefore the addition of transactions and their proofs (needed to be able to validate them) into the database should be made in such a way which profit from this competition.

If I see the reduction of a molecule (which may be itself distributed) as a service then besides the competition for making available the most useful transactions with the shortest proofs, there is another competition between brute force reducing it and using the available transactions, with all the time costs they need.

If well designed, these competitions should lead to the emergence of clusters of useful transactions (call such a cluster a “chemlisp”) and also to the emergence of better strategies for reducing molecules.

This will lead to more and more complex computations which are feasible with this system and probably fast enough they will become very hard to understand by a human mind, or even by using IT tools on a limited part of the users of the system.

Chemical transactions and their proofs

By definition a transaction is either a rewrite from the list of
accepted rewrites (say of chemlambda) or a composition of two
transaction which match. A transaction has a left and a right pattern
and a proof (which is the transaction expressed as a cascade of
accepted rewrites).

When you reduce a molecule, the output is a proof of a transaction.
The transaction proof itself is more important than the molecule from
the start. Indeed, if you think that the transaction proof looks like
a list

rm leftpattern1
add rightpattern1

where leftpattern1 is a list of lines of a mol file, same for the rightpattern1,

then you can deduce from the transaction proof only the following:
– the minimal initial molecule needed to apply this transaction, call
it the left pattern of the transaction
– the minimal final molecule appearing after the transaction, call it
the right pattern of the transaction

and therefore any transaction has:
– a left pattern
– a right pattern
– a proof made of a chain of other transaction which match (the right
pattern of transaction N contains the left pattern of transaction N+1)

It would be useful to think in term of transactions and their proofs
as the basic objects, not molecules.

Money and cloning

I’m thinking about money lately and I want to share with you a definition of money related to cloning. It may be relevant to virtual currencies.

What is money in an exchange transaction? In such a transaction there are two parts, say Alice and Bob. There are two items involved in the transaction, call them A and B.

Before the transaction:

  • Alice has A
  • Bob has B

After the transaction:

  • Alice has B
  • Bob has A

The question is: which one, A or B, is money? Mind that there are exchanges where none of them is money.

The proposed answer is the following: the money is that item which is hard to clone for both Alice and Bob and the transaction is made for the other item, which is hard to clone for only one part, Alice or Bob.

More clearly, say Alice has the money, item A. She cannot clone it, nor can Bob. So she exchanges it for B (say a pair of shoes), which is hard for Alice to clone (that’s why she obtains it from an exchange), but is easier for Bob to clone (that’s why he sells it, getting in exchange a hard to clone item).

So if we have a system where p2p exchanges are possible, then the money will be those items which are exchanged because they are hard to clone by everybody, and they will tend to be exchanged for items which are easy to clone by at least somebody.

If any of the hard/easy cloning properties change, then money disappear:

  • mints are cloning devices for real money, but if it becomes easy to mint money otherwise then that’s no longer money
  • for real or virtual money, of one can double spend a money item, it means it can be cloned, so it ceases to be money
  • money has to be scarce, as an effect of the fact it can’t be cloned
  • if a coin made of gold, minted by a king, is in circulation, then at some point the technology allows to clone it, for example by taking from each coin a minute amount of gold and mint new coins from this extra gold, by using a forged mint (for a virtual equivalent see  the Ethereum gas-related hacks)
  • money has to be hard to clone “objectively”, i.e. it is not enough to declare that money is hard to clone. There has to be some provably hard way to clone it.


An exercice with convex analysis and neural networks

This is a note about a simple use of convex analysis in relation with neural networks. There are many points of contact between convex analysis and neural networks, but I have not been able to locate this one, thanks for pointing me to a source, if any.

Let’s start with a directed graph with set of nodes N (these are the neurons) and a set of directed bonds B. Each bond has a source and a target, which are neurons, therefore there are source and target functions

s:B \rightarrow B   , t:B \rightarrow N

so that for any bond x \in B the neuron a = s(x) is the source of the bond and the neuron b = t(x) is the target of the bond.

For any neuron a \in N:

  • let in(a) \subset B be the set of bonds x \in B with target t(x)=a,
  • let out(a) \subset B be the set of bonds x \in B with source s(x)=a.

A state of the network is a function u: B \rightarrow V^{*} where V^{*} is the dual of a real vector space V. I’ll explain why in a moment, but it’s nothing strange: I’ll suppose that V and V^{*} are dual topological vector spaces, with duality product denoted by (u,v) \in V \times V^{*} \mapsto \langle v, u \rangle such that any linear and continuous function from V to the reals is expressed by an element of V^{*} and, similarly, any linear and continuous function from V^{*} to the reals is expressed by an element of V.

If you think that’s too much, just imagine V=V^{*} to be finite euclidean vector space with the euclidean scalar product denoted with the \langle , \rangle notation.

A weight of the network is a function w:B \rightarrow Lin(V^{*}, V), you’ll see why in a moment.

Usually the state of the network is described by a function which associates to any bond x \in B a real value u(x). A weight is a function which is defined on bonds and with values in the reals. This corresponds to the choice V = V^{*} = \mathbb{R} and \langle v, u \rangle = uv. A linear function from V^{*} to V is just a real number w.

The activation function of a neuron a \in N gives a relation between the values of the state on the input bonds and the values of the state of the output bonds: any value of an output bond is a function of the weighted sum of the values of the input bonds. Usually (but not exclusively) this is an increasing continuous function.

The integral of an increasing continuous function is a convex function. I’ll call this integral the activation potential \phi (suppose it does not depends on the neuron, for simplicity). The relation between the input and output values is the following:

for any neuron a \in N and for any bond y \in out(a) we have

u(y) = D \phi ( \sum_{x \in in(a)} w(x) u(x) ).

This relation generalizes to:

for any neuron a \in N and for any bond y \in out(a) we have

u(y) \in  \partial \phi ( \sum_{x \in in(a)} w(x) u(x) )

where \partial \phi is the subgradient of a convex and lower semicontinuous activation potential

\phi: V \rightarrow \mathbb{R} \cup \left\{ + \infty \right\}

Written like this, we are done with any smoothness assumptions, which is one of the strong features of convex analysis.

This subgradient relation also explains the maybe strange definition of states and weights with the vector spaces V and V^{*}.

This subgradient relation can be expressed as the minimum of a cost function. Indeed, to any convex function phi is associated a sync  (means “syncronized convex function, notion introduced in [1])

c: V \times V^{*} \rightarrow \mathbb{R} \cup \left\{ + \infty \right\}

c(u,v) = \phi(u) + \phi^{*}(v) - \langle v, u \rangle

where \phi^{*} is the Fenchel dual of the function \phi, defined by

\phi^{*}(v) = \sup \left\{ \langle v, u \rangle - \phi(u) \right\}

This sync has the following properties:

  • it is convex in each argument
  • c(u,v) \geq 0 for any (u,v) \in V \times V^{*}
  • c(u,v) = 0 if and only if v \in \partial \phi(u).

With the sync we can produce a cost associated to the neuron: for any a \in N, the contribution to the cost of the state u and of the weight w is

\sum_{y \in out(a)} c(\sum_{x \in in(a)} w(x) u(x) , u(y) ) .

The total cost function C(u,w) is

C(u,w) = \sum_{a \in N} \sum_{y \in out(a)} c(\sum_{x \in in(a)} w(x) u(x) , u(y) )

and it has the following properties:

  • C(u,w) \geq 0 for any state u and any weight w
  • C(u,w) = 0 if and only if for any neuron a \in N and for any bond y \in out(a) we have


u(y) \in  \partial \phi ( \sum_{x \in in(a)} w(x) u(x) )

so that’s a good cost function.


  • take \phi to be the softplus function \phi(u) =\ln(1+\exp(x))
  • then the activation function (i.e. the subgradient) is the logistic function
  • and the Fenchel dual of the softplus function is the (negative of the) binary entropy \phi^{*}(v) = v \ln(v) + (1-v) \ln(1-v) (extended by 0 for v = 0 or v = 1 and equal to + \infty outside the closed interval [0,1]).



[1] Blurred maximal cyclically monotone sets and bipotentials, with Géry de Saxcé and Claude Vallée, Analysis and Applications 8 (2010), no. 4, 1-14, arXiv:0905.0068



Euclideon Holoverse virtual reality games revealed

Congratulations! Via a comment by roy.  If there is any other news you have then you’re welcome here, as in the old days.

Bruce Dell has a way to speak, to choose colors and music which is his own. Nevertheless, to share the key speaker honor with Steve Wozniak is just great.



It rubs me a bit in the wrong direction when he says that he has the “world first new virtual lifeforms” at 7:30. Can they replicate? Do they have a metabolism? On their own, in random conditions?

If I sneeze in a Holoverse room, will they cough the next day? If they run into me, shall I dream new ideas about bruises later?


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