Tag Archives: chemlambda

More experiments with Open Science

I still don’t know which format is better for Open Science. I’m long past the article format for obvious reasons. Validation is a good word and concept because you don’t have to rely absolutely on opinions of others and that’s how the world works. This is not all the story though.

I am very fortunate to be a mathematician, not a biologist or biochemist. Still I long for the good format for Open Science, even if, as a mathematician, I don’t have the problems biologists or chemists have, namely loads and loads of experimental data and empirical approaches. I do have a world of my own to experiment with, where I do have loads of data and empirical constructs. My mind, my brain are real and I could understand myself by using tools of chemists and biologists to explore the outcomes of my research. Funny right? I can look at myself from the outside.

That is why  I chose to not jump directly to make Hydrogen, but instead to treat the chemlambda  world, again, as a guinea pig for Open Science.

There are 427 well written molecules in the chemlambda collection on Github. There are 385 posts in the chemlambda collection on Google+, most of them with animations from simulations of those molecules. It is a world, how big is it?

It is easy to make first a one page direct access to the chemlambda collection. It is funnier to build a phylogenetic tree of the molecules, based on their genes. That’s what I am doing now, based on a work in progress.

Each molecule can be decomposed in “genes” say, by a sequencer program. Then one can use a distance between these genes to estimate first how they cluster and later to make a phylogenetic tree.

Here is the first heatmap (using the edit distance between single occurrences of genes in molecules) of the 427 molecules.

Screenshot-22

Is a screenshot, proving that my custom programs work 🙂 (one understands more by writing some scripts than by taking tools ready made from others, at least at this stage of research).

Moreover, I see structure! The 427 molecules are made of copies of  605 different linear “genes” (i.e. sticks with colored ends)  and 38 ring shaped ones.  (Is easy to prove that lambda terms have no rings, when turned into molecules.) There are some interesting curved features visible in the edit distance of the sticks.

screenshot-23

They don’t look random enough.

Is clear that a phylogenetic tree is in reach, then what else than connecting the G+ collection posts with the molecules used, arranged along the tree…?

Can I discover which molecules are coming from lambda terms?

Can I discover how my mind worked when building these molecules?

Which are the neglected sides, the blind places?

I hope to be able to tell by the numbers.

Which brings me to the main subject of this post: which is a good format for an Open Science piece of research?

Right now I am in between two variants, which may turn out to not be as different as they seem. An OS research vehicle could be:

  • like a viable living organism, literary
  • or like a viable world, literary.

Only the future will tell which is which. Maybe both!

Chemlambda will be curated

Chemlambda appeared out of frustration that nobody understands and see what I do, so I had to write it. The same with the chemlambda collection, I’ll curate it and put it in one easy to figure out place. It’s doable. The only fear I have about this is to be sucked again in this highly hallucinatory universe, which is almost real now and will be really real soon.

So for the moment here’s a page which allows you to go directly to any of the chemlambda collection post.

Maybe this will improve my karma so I’ll be prepared to do pure hydrogen. The initial trials look very promising and despite the apparent simplicity (what? make required mathematics, space, physics and this simple atom, all invoked from abstract nonsense like in a super geometric Lisp) the hydrogen project is more difficult because there is no precedent.

So wish me luck 🙂

Synergistics talks through his chemlambda Haskell version

… in a very nice and clear, 9:30 presentation. I especially enjoyed from 5:32, when he describes what enzymes are and further, but all of the presentation is instructive because it starts from 0.

The video talk is this

His github repository chemlambda-hask is this

https://github.com/synergistics/chemlambda-hask

Thank you J, very nice!

Pharma meets the Internet of Things

Pharma meets the Internet of Things, some commented references for this future trend. Use them to understand

[0] After the IoT comes Gaia
https://chorasimilarity.wordpress.com/2015/10/30/after-the-iot-comes-gaia/

There are two realms of computation, which should and will become one: the IT technology and biochemistry.

General stuff

The notion of computation is now well known, we speak about what is computable and about various models of computation (i.e. how we compute) which always turned out to be equivalent in the sense that they give the same class of computable things (that’s the content of the Church-Turing thesis).

It is interesting though how we compute, not only what is computable.

In IT perhaps the biggest (and socially relevant) problem is decentralized asynchronous computing. Until now there is no really working solution of a model of computation which is:
– local in space (decentralized)
– local in time (asynchronous)
– with no pre-imposed hierarchy or external authority which forces coherence

In biochemistry, people know that we, anything living, are molecular assemblies which work:
– local in space (all chemical interactions are local)
– local in time (there is no external clock which synchronizes the reactions)
– random (everything happens without any external control)

Useful links for an aerial view on molecular computing, seen as the biochemistry side of computation:

[1] https://www.britannica.com/technology/DNA-computing

Some history and details provided. Quote from the end of the section “Biochemistry-based information technology”

“Other experiments have shown that basic computations may be executed using a number of different building blocks (for example, simple molecular “machines” that use a combination of DNA and protein-based enzymes). By harnessing the power of molecules, new forms of information-processing technology are possible that are evolvable, self-replicating, self-repairing, and responsive. The possible applications of this emerging technology will have an impact on many areas, including intelligent medical diagnostics and drug delivery, tissue engineering, energy, and the environment.”

[2] http://www.owlnet.rice.edu/~Cyrus.Mody/MyPubs/Molecular%20Electronics.pdf

A detailed historical view (written in 2000) of the efforts towards “molecular electronics”. Mind that’s not the same subject as [1], because the effort here is to use biochemistry to mimic silicon computers. While [1] also contains such efforts (building logical gates with DNA, etc), DNA computing does propose also a more general view: building structure from structure as nature does.

[3] https://www.extremetech.com/tag/molecular-computer

Two easy to read articles about real applications of molecular computing:
– “Microscopic machine mimics the ribosome, forms molecular assembly line”
– “Biological computer can decrypt images stored in DNA”

[4] https://www.technologyreview.com/s/601842/inside-genomics-pioneer-craig-venters-latest-production/

Article about Craig Venter from 2016, found by looking for “Craig Venter Illumina”. Other informative searches would be “Digital biological converter” or anything “Craig Venter”

[5] https://www.ted.com/talks/lee_cronin_print_your_own_medicine/transcript?language=en

Interesting talk by an interesting researcher Lee Cronin

[6] The Molecular Programming Project http://molecular-programming.org/

Worth to be browsed in detail for seeing the various trends and results

Sitting in the middle, between biochemistry and IT:

[1] Algorithmic Chemistry (Alchemy) of Fontana and Buss
http://fontana.med.harvard.edu/www/Documents/WF/Papers/alchemy.pdf

Walter Fontana today: http://fontana.med.harvard.edu/www/index.htm

[2] The Chemical Abstract Machine by Berry and Boudol

http://www.lix.polytechnique.fr/~fvalenci/papers/cham.pdf

[3] Molecular Computers (by me, part of an Open Science project, see also my homepage http://imar.ro/~mbuliga/ and the chemlambda github page https://github.com/chorasimilarity/chemlambda-gui/blob/gh-pages/dynamic/README.md )

http://chorasimilarity.github.io/chemlambda-gui/dynamic/molecular.html

On the IT side there’s a beautiful research field, starting of course with lambda calculus by Church. Later on this evolved in the direction of rewriting systems, then graph rewriting systems. I can’t even start to write all that’s done in this direction, other than:

[1] Y. Lafont, Interaction Combinators
http://iml.univ-mrs.fr/~lafont/pub/combinators.ps

but see as well the Alchemy, which uses lambda calculus!

However, it would be misleading to reduce everything to lambda calculus. I came to the conclusion that lambda calculus or Turing machines are only two among the vast possibilities, and not very important. My experience with chemlambda shows that the most relevant mechanism turns around the triple of nodes FI, FO, FOE and their rewrites. Lambda calculus is obtained by the addition of a pair of A (application) and L (lambda) nodes, along with standard compatible moves. One might use as well nodes related to a  Turing Machine instead, as explained in

http://chorasimilarity.github.io/chemlambda-gui/dynamic/turingchem.html

Everything works just the same. The center, what makes things work, is not related to Logic or Computation as they are usually considered. More later.

How to use the chemlambda collection of simulations

The chemlambda_casting folder (1GB) of simulations is now available on Figshare [1].

How to use the chemlambda collection of simulations? Here’s an example. The synthesis from a tape video [2] is reproduced here with a cheap animated gif. The movie records the simulation file 3_tape_long_5346.html which is available for download at [1].

That simple.

If you want to run it in your computer then all you have to do is to download 3_tape_long_5346.html from [1], download from the same place d3.min.js and jquery.min.js (which are there for your convenience). Put the js libs in the same folder as the html file. Open the html file with a browser, strongly recommend Safari or Chrome (not Firefox which blocks with these d3.js animations, for reasons related to d3). In case your computer has problems with the simulation (I used a macbook pro with safari) then slow it like this: edit the html file (with any editor) and look for the line starting with

return 3000 + (4*(step+(Math.random()*

and replace the “4” by “150”, it should be enough.

Here is a longer explanation. The best would be to read carefully the README [4].
“Advanced”: If you want to make another simulation for the same molecule then follow the steps.

1. The molecule used is 3_tape_long_5346.mol which is available at the library of chemlambda molecules [3].

2. So download the content of the gh-pages branch of the chemlambda repository at github [4] as explained in that link.

3. then follow the steps explained there and you’ll get a shiny new 3_tape_long_5346.html which of course may be different in details than the initial one (it depends on the script used, if you use the random rewrites scripts then of course the order of rewrites may be different).

[1] The Chemlambda collection of simulations
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.4747390.v1

[2] Synthesis from a tape
https://plus.google.com/+MariusBuliga/posts/Kv5EUz4Mdyp

[3] The library of chemlambda molecules
https://github.com/chorasimilarity/chemlambda-gui/tree/gh-pages/dynamic/mol

[4] Chemlambda repository (readme) https://github.com/chorasimilarity/chemlambda-gui/blob/gh-pages/dynamic/README.md

Announcement: chemlambda can be done with RNA (final update)

There exists an encoding of chemlambda molecules with RNA, in such a way that the chemlambda model can be realized via real RNA computing. 
I shall update this post with details concerning my motivations and about how the second part of the announcement fits with my activities.
I open a bidding session concerning a contract based collaboration which could convince me that you’re an expert and you can provide me with the means to do this together. As concerns the collaboration, I shall give you an edge into being the first who does it. Letters of interest may be addressed to Marius.Buliga@gmail.com, Marius.Buliga@imar.ro or via the chemlambda repository (gh-pages branch) .
Follow this post for updates.
UPDATE: the bidding session ends on OCT 30 2016. As a funny simulation enjoy
which however does not disclose almost anything about the main subject of this post. Compare it with the simulation (needing js enabled in your browser) from the article Molecular computers (which is the ancestor of the ideas relevant here).

UPDATE 2:  Bidding ends today  OCT 30 2016 at 12 PM UTC time, measured from the timestamp of messages reaching me.  You may say that this is a random boundary and I agree, that is why I propose the following use of words  in future public references to this boundary  distinction. Anybody who meaningfully contacted and contributed to this project before the time boundary will be publicly called a supporter. This will be only a small expression of my gratitude, dear supporters please expect much more.

I thought about using the word legacy in relation to the others. This would be true per the use of the word in computing (or open science). Nah, is enough that I’ll know and you’ll know 🙂

UPDATE 3: Bidding closed.

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