Graphic lambda calculus and chemlambda (IV)

This post continues with chemlambda v2. For the last post in the series see here.

Instead of putting even more material here, I thought it is saner to make a clear page with all details about the nodes and rewrites of chemlambda v2. Down the page there are examples of conflicts.

Not included in that page is the extension of chemlambda v2 with nodes for Turing machines. The scripts have them, in the particular case of a busy beaver machine. You can find this extension explained in the article Turing machines, chemlambda style.

Turing machines appear here differently from the translation technique of Lafont (discussed here, see also these (1), (2) for other relations between interaction combinators and chemlambda). Recall that he proves  prove that interaction combinators are Turing universal by:

  • first proving a different kind of universality among interaction nets, to me much more interesting than Turing universality, because purely graph related
  • then proving that any Turning machine can be turned into an interaction nets graphical rewrite system.

In this extension of chemlambda v2 the nodes for Turing machines are not translated from chemlambda, i.e. they are not given as chemlambda graphs. However, what’s interesting is that the chemlambda and Turing realm can work harmoniously together, even if based on different nodes.

An example is given in the Chemlambda for the people slides, with the name Virus structure with Turing machines, builts itself

spiral_boole_bb_short

but mind that the source link is no longer available, since I deleted the chemlambda g+ collection. The loops you see are busy beaver Turing Machines, the structure from the middle is pure chemlambda.

 

 

The shuffle trick in Lafont’ Interaction Combinators

For the shuffle trick see The illustrated shuffle trick…    In a way, it’s also in Lafont’ Interaction Combinators article, in the semantics part.

lafont-4

It’s in the left part of Figure 14.

In chemlambda the pattern involves one FO node and two FOE nodes. In this pattern there is first a FO-FOE rewrite and then a FI-FOE  one. After these rewrites we see that now we have a FOE instead of the FO node and two FO instead of the previous two FOE nodes. Also there is a swap of ports, like in the figure.

You can see it all in the linked post, an animation is this:

shuffle

For previous posts about Lafont paper and relations with chemlambda see:

If the nodes FO and FOE were dilations of arbitrary coefficients a and b, in an emergent algebra, then the equivalent rewrite is possible if and only if we are in a vector space. (Hint: it implies linearity, which implies we are in a conical group, therefore we can use the particular form of dilations in the general shuffle trick and we obtain the commutativity of the group operation. The only commutative conical groups are vector spaces.)

In particular the em-convex axiom implies the shuffle trick, via theorem 8.9 from arXiv:1807.02058  . So the shuffle trick is a sign of commutativity. Hence chemlambda alone is still not general enough for my purposes.

You may find interesting the post Groups are numbers (1) . Together with the em-convex article, it may indeed be deduced that [the use of] one-parameter groups [in Gleason-Yamabe and Montgomery-Zippin] is analoguous to the Church encoding of naturals. One-parameter groups are numbers. The em-convex axiom could be weakened to the statement that 2 is invertible and we would still obtain theorem 8.9. So that’s when the vector space structure appears in the solution of the Hilbert 5th problem. But if you are in a general group with dilations, where only the “em” part of the em-convex rewrite system applies (together with some torsor rewrites, because it’s a group), then you can’t invert 2, or generally any other number than 1, so you get only a structure of conical group at the infinitesimal level. However naturals exist even there, but they are not related to one-parameter groups.

Category theory is not a theory, here’s why: [updated]

Category theory does not make predictions.

This is a black and white formulation, so there certainly are exceptions. Feel free to contradict.

___________________________________________

UPDATE: As I’m watching Gromov on probability, symmetry, linearity, the first part:

I can’t stop noticing several things:

  • he repeatedly say “we don’t compute”, “we don’t make computations”
  • he rightly say that the classical mathematical notation hides the real thing behind, like for example by using numbers, sets, enumerations (of states for ex.)
  • and he clearly thinks that category theory is a more evolved language than the classical.

Yes, my opinion is that indeed the category theory language is more evolved than classical. But there is an even more evolved stage: computation theory made geometrical (or more symmetric, without the need for states, enumerations, etc).

Category theory is some kind of trap for those mathematicians who want to say something  is computable or something is, or should be an algorithm, but they don’t know how to say it correctly. Corectly means without the burden of external, unnatural bagagge, like enumeration, naming, evaluations, etc. So they resort to category theory language, because it allows them to abstract over sets, enumerations, etc.

There is no, yet, a fully geometrical version of computation theory.

What Gromov wants is to express himself in that ideal computation theory, but instead he only has category theory language to use.

Gromov computes and then he says this is not a computation.

Grothendieck, when he soaks the nut in the water, he lets the water compute. He just build a computer and let it run.  He reports the results, that’s what classical mathematical language permits.

That’s the problem with category theory, it does not compute, properly, just reports the results of it.

___________________________________________

As concerns the real way humans use category theory…

Mathematicians use category theory as a tool, or as a notation, or as a thought discipline, or as an explanation style. Definitely useful for the informed researcher! Or a life purpose for a few minds.

All hype for the fans of mathematics, computer science or other sciences. To them, category theory gives the false impression of understanding. Deep inside, the fan of science (who does not want/have time/understands anything of the subject) feels that all creative insights are based on a small repertoire of simple (apparently) tricks. Something that the fan can do, something which looks science-y, without the effort.

Then, there are the programmers, wonderful clever people who practice a new science and long for recognition from the classics 🙂 Category theory seems modular enough for them. A tool for abstraction, too, something they are trained in.  And — why don’t you recognize? — with that eternal polish of mathematics, but without the effort.

This is exploited cynically by good  public communicators with a creativity problem.  The recipe is: explain. Take an older, difficult creation, wash it with category theory and present it as new.

Graphic lambda calculus and chemlambda(III)

This post introduces chemlambda v2. I continue from the last post, which describes the fact that chemlambda v1, even if it has only local rewrites, it is not working well when used with the dumbest possible reduction algorithms.

Nature has to work with the dumbest algorithms, or else we live in a fairy tale.

Chemlambda v2 is an artificial chemistry, in the following sense:

  • it is a graph rewrite system over oriented fatgraphs made of a finite number of nodes, from the list: 5 types of 3-valent nodes, A (application), L (lambda abstraction), FO (fanout), FI (fanin), FOE (external fanout), 1 type of 2-valent node Arrow, 3 types of 1-valent nodes, FRIN (free in), FROUT (free out), T (termination). Compared to chemlambda v1, there is a new node, the FOE. The nodes, not the rewrites, are described in this early explanation called Welcome to the soup. (Mind that the gallery of example which is available at the end of these explanation mixes chemlambda v1 and chemlambda v2 examples. I updated the links so that is no longer pointing to this very early gallery of examples. However if you like it here is it.)
  • the rewrites CO-COMM and CO-ASSOC of chemlambda v1 are not available, instead there are several new DIST rewrites: FO-FOE, L-FOE, A-FOE, FI-FO, and a new beta like rewrite FI-FOE. As in chemlambda v1, the patterns of the rewrites fit with the interaction combinator rewrites if we forget the orientation of the edges, but the 3-valent nodes don’t have a principal port, so they don’t form interaction nets. Moreover, the are conflicts among the rewrites, i.e. there are configurations of 3 nodes such that we have a node which belongs to two pairs of nodes which may admit rewrites. The order of application of rewrites may matter for such conflicts.
  • there is an algorithm of application of rewrites, which is either the deterministic greedy algorithm with a list of priority of rewrites (for example beta rewrites have priority over DIST rewrites, whenever there is a conflict), or the random application algorithm.

 

Sources for chemlambda v2:

 

The goal of chemlambda v2: to explore the possibility of molecular computers in this artificial chemistry.

This needs explanations. Indeed,  does the system work with the simplest random algorithm? We are not interested into semantics, because it is, or it relies on global notions, We are not (very) interested into reduction strategies for lambda terms, because they are not as simple as the dumbest algorithms we use here. Likewise for readback, etc.

So, does chemlambda v2 work enough for making molecular computers?  Pure untyped lambda calculus reduction problems are an inspiration. If the system works for the particular case of graphs related to lambda terms then this is a bonus for this project.

As you see, instead of searching for an algorithm which could implement, decentralized say, a lambda calculus reduction strategy, we ask if a particular system reduces (graphs related to) terms with one algorithm from the fixed class of dumbest ones.

That is why the universality in the sense of Lafont is fascinating. In this post I argued that Lafont universality property of interaction combinators means, in this pseudo-chemical sense, that the equivalent molecular computer based on interaction combinators reactions (though not the translations) works for implementing a big enough class of reactions which are Turing universal in particular (Lafont  shows concretely that he can implement Turing machines).

(continues with the part IV)

Graphic lambda calculus and chemlambda (II)

Chemlambda v2 is an entirely different project than GLC and chemlambda v1. This post continues from the first part. It explains the passage towards chemlambda v2.

A problem of GLC and chemlambda v1 is that research articles are opinion pieces, not validated by programs and experiments. The attempt to use GLC with the Actor Model in order to build a decentralized computing proposal, aka distributed GLC, failed because of this. Does all of this work?

The CO-COMM and CO-ASSOC rewrites lead to the situation that,  in order to be useful, either:

  • they have to be applied by a human or by a(n unknown) very clever algorithm
  • or they are applied in both directions randomly, which implies that no GLC or chemlambda v1 reduction ever terminates.

Here is an early visual tutorial  which introduces the nodes of chemlambda v2.  At the end of it you are pointed to See also a gallery of examples which mixes chemlambda v1 with chemlambda v2, like these:

 

Or, another example, the Y combinator. In chemlambda v1, without using CO-COMM and CO-ASSOC, the Y combinator applied to an unspecified term behaves like this.  In chemlambda v2, where there is a supplimentary node and other rewrites, the Y combinator behaves almost identically, but some nodes (the yellow FOE here instead of the green FO before) are different:

 

ycombi

 

 

See this page for a list of works, tagged with the version of chemlambda used.

(continues with part III)

 

 

Graphic lambda calculus and chemlambda (I)

Looks like there is a need to make a series of posts dedicated to the people who try to use this blog as a source in order to understand graphic lambda calculus (aka GLC) and chemlambda. This is the first one.

Sources for GLC:

  • the best source is the article M. Buliga, Graphic lambda calculus. Complex Systems 22, 4 (2013), 311-360   (link to article in journal) (link to article in arXiv)
  • you can see the GLC page (link) here, which has been updated many times after chemlambda appeared, but it is unmodified starting from the section “What is graphic lambda calculus?” and there are links to many others posts here which explain GLC as it is, that is before chemlambda.

GLC is a graph rewriting system for fatgraphs made of trivalent or 1-valent nodes. The trivalent nodes used are A (application), L (lambda), FO (fanout), epsilon (for dilations). There is one 1-valent node, T (termination). Loops with no nodes and arrows, i.e. oriented edges with no nodes are accepted as well. There is no algorithm proposed for the reduction of these graphs.

The graph rewrites are:

– local ones (i.e. involving only a finite number, a priori given, of nodes and edges)

  •   graphic beta move, which is like Lamping graph rewrite, only purely local, i.e. there is no limitation on the global shape of the graph, thus it is  somehow more general than the beta rewrite from untyped lambda beta calculus; a possible interpretation is C= let x=B in A rewrites to x=B and C=A

 

  • betaCO-COMM and CO-ASSOC rewrites for the FO (fanout) which are, due to the orientation of the edges, really like graphical, AST forms of co-commutativity and co-associativity
  • local pruning group of rewrites, which describe the interaction of the trivalent nodes with the T node; incidentally T and FO interact like if T is a co-unit for FO
  • a group of rewrites for the dilation nodes, which are those of emergent algebras, which involve the fanout FO and the dilation nodes

 

– global rewrites:

  • global fan-out
  • global pruning

 

In section 3 of the article on GLC is given an algorithm of conversion of untyped lambda terms into graphs which is a little more than a modification of the AST of the lambda term, in such a way that the orientation of the edges is respected. That is because the lambda node L has one incoming edge and two outgoing edges!

I prove then that GLC can be used for untyped lambda beta calculus, but also for emergent algebras and also for a variant of knot theoretic graphs where there is no need for them to be planar. Finally, I show that there might be other “sectors” of graphs which may be interesting, regardless of their meaning (or lack of it) with respect to lambda calculus.

The problem of GLC is that it has these global rewrites. Can these be replaced by local rewrites?

That’s how chemlambda appeared.

I was aware that some applications of global fanout can be done with local rewrites, but not all. Also, the interest in GLC was not extended to the interest into emergent algebras, to my dismay.

On the other side I became obsessed with the idea that if the global fanout can be replaced by local rewrites entirely then it should be possible in principle to see the rewrites as chemical reactions between individual molecules. A bigger problem would be then: would these reactions reduce the graph-molecules under the dumbest algorithm among all, the random one? Nature functions like this, so any algorithm which would be global in some sense is completely excluded.

This led me to write the article: M. Buliga, Chemical concrete machine (link to DOI) (link to arXiv version).  This is chemlambda v1, which is actually a transition from GLC to something else, or better said to another research subject in the making.

Other sources for this mix glc-chemlambda v1:

 

Chemlambda v1, or the “chemical concrete machine”, is a graph rewriting algorithm which uses the trivalent nodes A, L, FI (fan-in), FO, and the 1-valent node T and only local rewrites:

  • the graphic beta rewrite (between the nodes L and A) and the fan-in rewrite (between the nodes FI and FO)

 

convention_2

 

  • the CO-COMM and CO-ASSOC rewrites

 

 

convention_3

 

  • two DIST (from distributivity) rewrites, for the pairs A-FO and L-FO

 

 

convention_6

  • local pruning rewrites (involving the 1-valent node T)

 

convention_4

 

  •  and elimination of loops

 

convention_5

 

As you see, all rewrites except CO-COMM and CO-ASSOC are alike the ones from Lafont article Interaction combinators, except that the graphs are directed and the nodes don’t have a principal port for interaction. Here are the interaction combinators rewrites

 

 

lafont-2

In the chemical concrete machine article are mentioned Berry and Boudol chemical abstract machine and Fontana and Buss alchemy, but not Lafont.  My fault. From what I knew then the beta rewrite came from Lamping or better Wadsworth, the fan-in came from Turaev (knotted trivalent graphs), and the DIST rewrites came from the graphical version of linear emergent algebras, or even better from the Reidemeister 3 rewrite in knot theory.

 

 

In this article there is no algorithm for application of the rewrites. (You shall see that in chemlambda v2, which is an artificial chemistry,  there are actually several, among them the deterministic greedy one, with a list of priority of the rewrites, because there are collisions otherwise, and the random one, which interested me the most.)

However I suggest that the rewrites can be seen as done in a truly chemical sense, mediated by (invisible) enzymes, each rewrite type with it’s enzyme.

I proved that we can translate from GLC to chemlambda v1 and that global fan-out and global pruning can be replaced by sequences of rewrites from chemlambda v1. There was no proof that this replacement of the global rewrites with cascades of local rewrites can be done by the algorithms considered. I proved the Turing universality by using the BCKW system of combinators.

The chemical concrete machine article ends however with:

“With a little bit of imagination, if we look closer to what TRUE, FALSE and IFTHENELSE are doing, we see that it is possible to adapt the IFTHENELSE to a molecule which releases, under the detection of one molecule (like TRUE), the ”medicine” A, and under the detection of another molecule (like FALSE) the ”medicine” B.”

The chemlambda page (link) here is reliable for chemlambda v1, but it also contain links to newer versions.

[UPDATE: I retrieved this view from 2014  of the story.]

(continues with part II)

 

A quine in Lafont’ Interaction combinators

I continue with a second post about Y. Lafont Interaction combinators. Here is the first one.

In the Figure 3 from the article is given an example of a nonterminating computation:

lafont-3

This is a quine. Indeed it is a graph which has a periodic evolution under the deterministic greedy reduction algorithm, using the interaction rules (i.e. the graph rewrites) of interaction combinators.

By comparison, a chemlambda quine is a molecule (graph in chemlambda) which has a periodic evolution under the deterministic greedy reduction algorithm which uses the chemlambda graph rewrites, with the priority of the rewrites set to “viral”, i.e. the DIST family of rewrites comes first. In chemlamdba is needed a prority of rewrites (for the deterministic algorithm) because there exist conflicts between the rewrites, i.e. overlaping left patterns.

About a third of the molecules from the library are chemlambda quines and they are interesting mostly when reduced with the random reduction algorithm. While for interaction combinators the random reduction algorithm brings nothing new (the system is confluent), for chemlambda with the random reduction algorithm the system is not confluent and the chemlambda quines may die. All of the quines from the library are at best immortal, i.e. the probability of death does not depend on the age of the molecule.

A reason for this phenomenon is that all these chemlambda quines don’t use termination nodes (which correspond to the epsilon nodes of interaction combinators). The smallest chemlambda quine without T nodes is the 9_quine, which has  9 nodes. But we may use termination nodes and produce a quine which is similar to Lafont’ example:

lafont-quine-1-det

In mol notation this quine is:

FO 1 2 3
T 2
FOE 3 4 1
T 4

The animation is obtained with the scripts from the chemlambda repository, in the same way as those used for the comparison with the Dynamic GOI Machine. In order to obtain a deterministic reduction all weights (i.e. all parameters “wei_*” from the relevant awk script were set to 0.

You see that this is really a 6 nodes quine, why? Because even in Lafont example, a deterministic greedy reduction would lead at step 2 to the simultaneous application of rewrites which increase the number of nodes and of those which decrease the number of nodes, so a correct application of the deterministic greedy algorithm would be similar with the example from chemlambda.

Maybe it would be interesting (as a tool) and straightforward to modify the chemlambda scripts into an interaction combinators version.