Tag Archives: scholarly poor

Google translate helps the scholarly poor

Do you know what “scholarly poor” means? I saw this formulation some time ago and it made me ask: am I scholarly poor?

You find this expression in the writings of those who praise Gold Open Access, or in the articles which try to understand the Sci-Hub phenomenon.

Recall that Gold OA means practically that authors pay to publish from funds they receive for research. It’s all in the language: Green OA is not for publication, no sir! Green OA is for archiving. Gold OA is for publication and it may incur costs, you see, which may be covered by the authors. (The readers can no longer be forced to pay, so who’s left?) And the authors pay, not from their pockets, because they are not crazy rich to create and moreover to pay thousands of $ to publish their article. They pay from the funds they receive for reseach, because their bosses, the academic managers, ask them to. These academic managers just love the publishers, be them the traditional ones or this new modern Gold OA blend. They don’t like the Green OA, there’s no money involved, pooh! no value.

Sci-Hub made available practically any scientific article, therefore there is no longer any difference between an article published gratis, but behind a paywall, and an article published for 2000$ and free to read. Both are as easily accessible. IANAL but this is the reality of the world we are living in.

This reality upsets the Gold OA proponents, so they use this expression “scholarly poor” to denote those scholars which don’t have institutional access to the paywalled articles. Because Gold OA proponents love academic managers who are not poor, they ignore the reality that the researchers, in poor or rich (crazy?) academic institutions, all of them would rather read either from Green OA (like arXiv) or from Sci-Hub or from their colleagues who put online their work.

In itself, to name a researcher “scholarly poor” is distasteful.

But Google comes to the rescue! When I first saw this expression I was curious how it translates to French, for example, another language I understand.

scholarly-1

 

Thank you Google Translate! And HAHA. And so poetical!

I checked again, today, when I decided to write this post. I recorded myself using the translate:

scholarly-2

 

Yes, OK, a bit more bland, less poetical, but moreĀ  comical for the public at large.

So right, though!