Tag Archives: emergent algebra

Rigidity of algebraic structure: principle of common cause

I follow with a lot of interest the stream of posts by Terence Tao on the Hilbert’s fifth problem and I am waiting impatiently to see how it connects with the field of approximate groups.

In his latest post Tao writes that

… Hilbert’s fifth problem is a manifestation of the “rigidity” of algebraic structure (in this case, group structure), which turns weak regularity (continuity) into strong regularity (smoothness).

This is something amazing and worthy of exploration!
I propose the following “explanation” of this phenomenon, taking the form of the:

Principle of common cause: an uniformly continuous algebraic structure has a smooth structure because both structures can be constructed from an underlying emergent algebra (introduced here).

Here are more explanations (adapted from the first paper on emergent algebras):

A differentiable algebra, is an algebra (set of operations A) over a manifold X with the property that all the operations of the algebra are differentiable with respect to the manifold structure of X. Let us denote by D the differential structure of the manifold X.
From a more computational viewpoint, we may think about the calculus which can be
done in a differentiable algebra as being generated by the elements of a toolbox with two compartments “A” and “D”:

– “A” contains the algebraic information, that is the operations of the algebra, as
well as algebraic relations (like for example ”the operation ∗ is associative”, or ”the operation ∗ is commutative”, and so on),
– “D” contains the differential structure informations, that is the information needed in order to formulate the statement ”the function f is differentiable”.
The compartments “A” and “D” are compatible, in the sense that any operation from “A” is differentiable according to “D”.

I propose a generalization of differentiable algebras, where the underlying differential structure is replaced by a uniform idempotent right quasigroup (irq).

Algebraically, irqs are related with racks and quandles, which appear in knot theory (the axioms of a irq correspond to the first two Reidemeister moves). An uniform  irq is a family of irqs indexed by elements of a commutative group (with an absolute), such that  the third Reidemeister move is related to a statement in terms of uniform limits of composites of operations of the family of irqs.

An emergent algebra is an algebra A over the uniform irq X such that all operations and algebraic relations from A can be constructed or deduced from combinations of operations in the uniform irq, possibly by taking limits which are uniform with respect to a set of parameters. In this approach, the usual compatibility condition between algebraic information and differential information, expressed as the differentiability of algebraic operations with respect to the differential structure, is replaced by the “emergence” of algebraic operations and relations from the minimal structure of a uniform irq.

Thus, for example, algebraic operations and the differentiation operation (taking   the triple (x,y,f) to Df(x)y , where “x, y” are  points and “f” is a function) are expressed as uniform limits of composites of more elementary operations. The algebraic operations appear to be differentiable because of algebraic abstract nonsense (obtained by exploitation of the Reidemeister moves) and because of the uniformity assumptions which allow us to freely permute limits with respect to parameters in the commutative group (as they tend to the absolute), due to the uniformity assumptions.

Hilbert fifth’s problem without one parameter subgroups

Further I reproduce, with small modifications, a comment   to the post

Locally compact groups with faithful finite-dimensional representations

by Terence Tao.

My motivation lies in the  project   described first time in public here.  In fact, one of the reasons to start this blog is to have a place where I can leisurely explain stuff.

Background:    The answer to the  Hilbert fifth’s problem  is: a connected locally compact group without small subgroups is a Lie group.

The key idea of the proof is to study the space of one parameter subgroups of the topological group. This space turns out to be a good model of the tangent space at the neutral element of the group (eventually) and the effort goes towards turning upside-down this fact, namely to prove that this space is a locally compact topological vector space and the “exponential map”  gives a chart  of  (a neighbourhood of the neutral element of ) the group into this space.

Because I am a fan of differential structures   (well, I think they are only the commutative, boring side of dilation structures  or here or emergent algebras)   I know a situation when one can prove the fact that a topological group is a Lie group without using the one parameter subgroups!

Here starts the original comment, slightly modified:

Contractive automorphisms may be as relevant as one-parameter subgroups for building a Lie group structure (or even more), as shown by the following result from E. Siebert, Contractive Automorphisms on Locally Compact Groups, Math. Z. 191, 73-90 (1986)

5.4. Proposition. For a locally compact group G the following assertions are equivalent:
(i) G admits a contractive automorphism group;
(ii) G is a simply connected Lie group whose Lie algebra g admits a positive graduation.

The corresponding result for local groups is proved in L. van den Dries, I. Goldbring, Locally Compact Contractive Local Groups, arXiv:0909.4565v2.

I used Siebert result for proving the Lie algebraic structure of the metric tangent space to a sub-riemannian manifold in M. Buliga, Infinitesimal affine geometry of metric spaces endowed with a dilatation structure, Houston Journal of Mathematics, 36, 1 (2010), 91-136. arXiv:0804.0135v2

(added here: see  in Corollary 6.3 from “Infinitesimal affine …” paper, as well as Proposition 5.9 and Remark 5.10 from the paper  A characterization of sub-riemannian spaces as length dilation structures constructed via coherent projections, Commun. Math. Anal. 11 (2011), No. 2, pp. 70-111 , arXiv:0810.5042v4 )

When saying that contractive automorphisms, or approximately contractive automorphisms [i.e. dilation structures], may be more relevant than one-parameter subgroups, I am thinking about sub-riemannian geometry again, where a one-parameter subgroup of a group, endowed with a left-invariant distribution and a corresponding Carnot-Caratheodory distance, is “smooth” (with respect to Pansu-type derivative) if and only if the generator is in the distribution. Metrically speaking, if the generator  is not in the distribution then any trajectory of the one-parameter group has Hausdorff dimension greater than one. That means lots of problems with the definition of the exponential and any reasoning based on differentiating flows.