The salvaged collection of animations (II)

UPDATE: Chemlambda collection of animations is the version of the collection hosted on github. The original site is under very heavy traffic (in Jan 2020).

UPDATE: much better now, although I seriously consider to jump directly to pure see. However is very rewarding to pass over blocks.

collection

(Continues the first post.) I forgot how much the first awk chemlambda scripts were honed, and how much the constants of the animations produced were further picked so to illustrate in a visually interesting way a point of view. The bad part of the animations first produced is that they are big html files, sometimes taking very long to execute.

The all-in-one js solution built by ishanpm, then modified and enhanced by me, works well and fast for graphs with a no of nodes up to 1000, approximatively. The physics is fixed, there are only two controls: gravity (slider) which allows to expand/contract the graphs, and the rewrites slider, which changes the probabilities of rewrites which increase/decrease the number of nodes. Although there is randomness (initially in the ishanpm js solution there was not), it is a weak and not very physical one (considering the idea that the rewrites are caused by enzymes). It is funny that the randomness is not taken seriously, see for example the short programs of formality.

After I revived the collection of animations from G+ (I kept about 300 of them), I still had to associate the animations with the mol files used (many of them actually not in the mol library available) and to use the js chemlambda version (i.e. this one) with the associated mol files. In this way the user would have the possibility to re-done the animations.

It turns out it does not work like this. The result is almost always of much lesser quality than the animation. However, the sources of the animations (obtained from the awk scripts) are available here.  But as I told at the beginning of the post, they are hard to play (fast enough for the goldfish attention), actually this was the initial reason for producing animations, because the first demos, even chosen to be rather short, were still too long…

So this is a more of a work of art, which has to be carefully restored. I have to extract the useful info from the old simulations and embed it into a full js solution. Coming back to randomness, in the original version there are random cascades of rewrites, not random rewrites, one at a time, like in the new js version… and they extinguish the randomly available pockets of enzymes, according to some exponential laws… and so on. That is why the animations look more impressive than the actual fast solution, at least for big graphs.

It is true that the js tools from the quine graphs repository have many advantages: interaction combinators are embedded, there is a lambda calculus to chemlambda parser… With these tools I discovered that the 10 nodes quine does reproduce, that the ouroboros is mortal, that there are many small quines (in interaction combinators too), etc.

And it turns out that I forgot that many interesting mols and other stuff was left unsaid or is not publicly available. My paranoid self in action.

In conclusion probably I’ll make available some 300 commented gifs from the collection and I’ll pass to the scientific part. I’d gladly expose the art part somewhere, but there seems to be no place for this art, technically, as there is no place, technically, for the science part, as a whole, beyond just words telling stories.

There will be, I’m sure.

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