Lambda calculus to chemlambda parser (2) and more slides

This post has two goals: (1) to explain more about the lambda to chemlambda parser and (2) to talk about slides of presentations which are connected one with the other across different fileds of research.

(1) There are several incremental improvements to the pages from the quine graphs repository. All pages, including the parser one, have two sliders, each giving you control about some parameters.

The “gravity” slider is kind of obvious. Recall that you can use your mose (or pinching gestures) to zoom in or out the graph you see. With the gravity slider you control gravity. This allows you to see better the edges of the graph, for example, by moving the gravity slider to the minimum and then by zooming out. Or, on the contrary, if you have a graph which is too spreaded, you can increase gravity, which will have as aeffect a more compactly looking graph.

The “rewrites weights slider” has as extrema the mysterious words “grow” and “slim”. It works like this. The rewrites (excepting COMB, which are done preferentially anyway) are grouped into those which increase the number of nodes (“grow”) and the other ones, which decrease the number of nodes (“slim”).

At each step, the algorithm tries to pick at random a rewrite. If there is a COMB rewrite to pick, then it is done. Else, the algorithm will try to pick at random one “grow” and one “slim” rewrite. If there is only one of these available, i.e. if there a “grow” but no “slim” rewrite, then this rewrite is done. Else, if there is a choice between two randomly choses “grow” and “slim” rewrites, we flip a coin to choose among them. The coin is biased towards “grow” or “slim” with the rewrites weights slider.

This is interesting to use, for example with the graphs which come from lambda terms. Many times, but not always, we are interested in reducing the number of nodes as fast as possible. A strategy would be to move the slider to “slim”.

In the case of quines, or quine fights, it is interesting to see how they behave under “grow” or “slim” regime.

Now let’s pass to the parser. Now it works well, you can write lambda terms in a human way, but mind that “xy” will be seen as a variable, not as the application of “x” to “y”. Application is “x y”. Otherwise, the parser understands correctly terms like

(\x.\y.\z.z y x) (\x.x x)(\x. x x)\x.x

Then I followed the suggestion of my son Matei to immediately do the COMB rewrites, thus eliminating the Arrow nodes given by the parser.

About the parser itself. It is not especially short, because of several reasons. One reason is that it is made as a machine with 3 legs, moving along the string given by the lexer. Just like the typical 3-valent node. So that is why it will be interesting to see it in action, visually. Another reason is that the parser first builds the graph without fanout FO and termination T nodes, then adds the FO and and T nodes. Finally, the lambda term is not prepared in advance by any global means (excepting the check for balanced parantheses). For example no de Bruijn indices.

Another reason is that it allows to understand what edges of the (mol) graph are, or more precisely what port variables (edge variables) correspond to. The observation is that the edges are in correspondence with the position of the item (lparen, rparen, operation, variable) in the string. We need at most N edge names at this stage, where N is the length of the string. Finally, the second stage, which adds the FO and T nodes, needs at most N new edge names, practically much less: the number of duplicates of variables.

This responds to the question: how can we efficiently choose edge names? We could use as edge name the piece of the string up to the item and we can duble this number by using an extra special character. Or if we want to be secretive, now that we now how to constructively choose names, we can try to use and hide this procedure.

Up to now there is no “decorator”, i.e. the inverse procedure to obtain a lambda term from a graph, when it is possible. This is almost trivial, will be done.

I close here this subject, by mentioning that my motivation was not to write a parser from lambda to chemlambda, but to learn how to make a parser from a programming language in the making. You’ll see and hopefully you’ll enjoy 🙂

(2) Slides, slides, slides. I have not considered slides very interesting as a mean of communication before. But hey. slides are somewhere on the route to an interactive book, article, etc.

So I added to my page links to 3 related presentations, which with a 4th available and popular (?!) on this blog, give together a more round image of what I try to achieve.

These are:

  • popular slides of a presentation about hamiltonian systems with dissipation, in the form baptized “symplectic Brezis-Ekeland-Nayroles”.  Read them in conjuction with arXiv:1902.04598, see further why
  • (Artificial physics for artificial chemistry)   is a presentation which, first, explains what chemlambda is in the context of artificial chemistries, then proceeds with using a stochastic formulation of hamiltonian systems with dissipation as an artificial physics for this artificial chemistry. An example about billiard ball computers is given. Sure, there is an article to be written about the details, but it is nevertheless interesting to infer how this is done.
  • (A kaleidoscope of graph rewrite systems in topology, metric geometry and computer science)  are the most evolved technically slides, presenting the geometrical roots of chemlambda and related efforts. There are many things to pick from there, like: what is the geometrical problem, how is it related to emergent algebras, what is computation, knots,  why standard frames in categorical logic can’t help (but perhaps it can if they start thinking about it), who was the first programmer in chemlambda, live pages where you can play with the parser, closing with an announcement that indeed anharmonic lambda (in the imperfect form of kali, or kaleidoscope) soves the initial problem after 10 years of work. Another article will be most satisfactory, but you see, people rarely really read articles on subjects they are not familiar with. These slides may help.
  • and for a general audience my old (Chemlambda for the people)  slides, which you may appreciate more and you may think about applications of chemlambda in the real world. But again, what is the real world, else than a hamiltonian system with dissipation? And who does the computation?

 

 

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