A geometric viewpoint on computation?

Let me try to explain what I am trying to do in this work related to “computing with space“. The goal is to understand the process of emergence, in its various precise mathematical forms, like:

- how the dynamics of a big number of particles becomes the dynamics of a continuous system? Apart the physics BS of neglecting infinities, I know of very few mathematically correct approaches. From my mixed background of calculus of variations and continuous media mechanics, I can mention an example of such an approach  in the work of Andrea Braides    on the \Gamma-convergence of the energy functional of a discrete system to the energy functional of a continuous system and atomistic models of solids.

- how to endow a metric space (like a fractal, or sub-riemannian space) with a theory of differential calculus? Translated: how to invent “smoothness” in spaces where there is none, apparently? Because smoothness is certainly emergent. This is part of the field of non-smooth calculus.

- how to explain the profound resemblance between geometrical results of Gromov on groups with polynomial growth and combinatorial results of Breuillard, Gree, Tao on approximate groups? In both cases a nilpotent structure emerges from considering larger and larger scales. The word “explain” means here: identify a general machine at work in both results.

- how to explain the way our brain deals with visual input?  This is a clear case of emergence because the input is the excitation of some receptors of the retina and the output is almost completely not understood, except that we all know that we see objects which are moving and complex geometrical relations among them. A fly sees as well, read From insect vision to robot vision by N. Franceschini, J.M. Pichon, C. Blanes. Related to this paper, I cite from the abstract (boldfaced by me):

  We designed, simulated, and built a complete terrestrial creature which moves about and avoids obstacles solely by evaluating the relative motion between itself and the environment. The compound eye uses an array of elementary motion detectors (EMDS) as smart, passive ranging sensors. Like its physiological counterpart, the visuomotor system is based on analogue, continuous-time processing and does not make use of conventional computers. It uses hardly any memory to adjust the robot’s heading in real time via a local and intermittent visuomotor feedback loop.

More generally, there seems to be a “computation” involved in vision, massively parallel and taking very few steps (up to six), but it is not understood how this is a computation in the mathematical, or computer science sense. Conversely, the visual performances of any device based on computer science computation up to now, are dwarfed by any fly.

I identified a “machine of emergence” which is in work in some of the examples given above. Mathematically, this machine should have something to do with emergent algebras, but what about the computation part?

Probably geometers reason like flies: by definition, a geometrical statement is invariant up to the choice of maps. A sphere is not, geometrically speaking, a particular atlas of maps on the sphere. For a geometer, reproducing whatever it does by using ad-hoc enumeration by  natural numbers, combinatorics  and Turing machines is nonsense, because profoundly not geometrical.

On the other hand, the powerful use and control of abstraction is appealing to the geometer. This justifies the effort to import abstraction techniques from computer science and to replace the non-geometrical stuff by … whatever is more of a geometrical character.

For the moment, such efforts are mostly a source of frustration, a familiar feeling for any mathematician.

But at some point, in these times of profound changes in, mathematics as well as in the society, from all these collective efforts will emerge something beautiful, clear and streamlined.

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s